Friday, June 15 Sessions & Panels   

Tim Kenney, Master Gardener Priorities


2017 Master Gardener Conference


2017 Agenda

 

 

2017 Thomas Ranier Keynote Audience

 

Thomas Rainer Book Signing

 

 

Heather Holm

 

Karl Foord

 

Keynote Speaker

 

Jeff Lowenfels

 

 

Anniversary Party

 

Kalidascopes

 

Diane Rankin

 

Paul Wood

 

Poster Session

 

Origami in the Garden

 

Fountain

  • CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON HARDINESS ZONES AND OTHER GARDENING ASSETS
    Mark Seeley 
    Climatologist and Meteorologist
     
  • Plenary Speaker 
    DESIGNING THE MODERN LANDSCAPE GARDEN
    “Green” is important in all parts of our lives from supplying food to nourish, beauty to observe, space to recreate, and air we breathe. As gardeners, we get to choose how to shape our small to large lands, often deciding between if they are ornamental gardens or ecologically fit landscapes. However, both horticulture and conservation values can be utilized in our livable landscapes. Learn about design methods, plant selection, and management techniques used in various public landscapes. How these principles are translatable to residential gardens. Examples derive from the gardens on the High Line, Rose F. Kennedy Greenway, and The Parklands of Floyds Fork that all are part of the modern public park movement that shape our modern landscape gardens.
    Tom Smarr  

    Horticulture & Natural Areas Director, 21st Century Parks Inc.

  • 50 Minute Plenary Panel
    MASTER GARDENERS AND YOUTH: GREEN GARDEN BAKERY PANEL

    LaDonna Redmond (Moderator)

  • Leadership Track: Large Group Discussion
    LET'S TALK ABOUT MASTER GARDENERS IN SMALL COMMUNITIES    Handout
    Over the past several years, we have gathered suggestions from Master Gardeners from across Minnesota relating to the areas of “Awareness and Promotion”, “Recruitment and Retention” and “Community Engagement”.  During this session, Jackie will share the compiled suggestions following a Fast Talk format.  
    Jackie Froemming

    University of Minnesota Extension

  • Leadership Track: 50 Minute Break Out Session
    NAVIGATE CONFLICT WITH SUCCESS 
    Handout 1,  Handout 2
    Mary Ann Hennen,
    University of Minnesota Extension Educator, Leadership and Civic Engagement

  • Leadership Track: 50 Minute Break Out Session
    DIVERSITY 101: WHAT IT IS AND IS NOT
    Sandra L. Mitchell,
    University of Minnesota CFANS, Intercultural Education Program Specialist

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    WHAT DOES
    SUCCESSFUL LEARNING FOR YOUTH IN THE GARDEN LOOK LIKE?
    Mindy Zittel, 
    Minnesota Landscape Arboretum and Erin Ostrowski, SNAP-Ed, University of Minnesota Extension

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    SELECTING NATIVE TREES AND SHRUBS THAT SUPPORT POLLINATORS
    Heather Holm
    Award-winning Author

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    HONEYCRISP AND BEYOND; APPLE BREEDING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

    Learn about the University of Minnesota's apple breeding program which has been developing new apple varieties that can survive in zone 4 or colder climates for 110 years.  You'll have an opportunity to hear about the process of developing new apple varieties such as Honeycrisp, SweeTango and the newest release, First Kiss/Rave.

    David Bedford
    Senior Research Fellow, Horticulture Research Center, University of Minnesota

  • 3 Hour Workshop
    CAPITALIZING ON THE THERAPEUTIC VALUE OF WORKING WITH PLANTS AND PEOPLE
    "Horticulture" can be succinctly defined as the art and science of people growing plants.  In Master Gardener training there is an emphasis on the art and science of growing plants. In this hands-on workshop, participants will focus on creating meaningful and measurable gardening programs for the PEOPLE in the definition. 

    Objectives for the workshop include:
        1. Participants will demonstrate strategies of engagement     for a variety of audiences (non-gardeners, elders, audiences with limited sensory, physical, or cognitive functioning).
        2. Participants will use appropriate terminology associated    with engaging users with varying abilities
        3. Participants will share how they will apply the concepts in their community projects with the audiences they are engaging.

    Dr. Jeannie Larson, Manager, Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Nature-Based Therapeutics and Mike Maddox, Director of the University of Wisconsin Master Gardener Program

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    BUILDING SUCCESSFUL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MASTER GARDENERS AND SCHOOLYARD GARDENS

    Lynn Olson
    and Susan Fleming,
    Hennepin County Extension Master Gardeners

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    FLOWERS, FRUITS, AND FLIERS:  GROWING FRUIT WITH NATURE IN MIND
    The idea of growing your own fresh fruit is likely to tempt any gardeners sweet tooth.  But doing so in the climate and conditions of the Upper Midwest is often easier said than done. Paying attention to the basics of biology, botany, and bees (as well as other pollinators) will help you find success in your fruit growing endeavours. In this presentation, we’ll discuss how orienting yourself to the patterns and processes of nature can help you better manage your garden and enjoy the fruits of your labors (so to speak). We’ll then take a deeper look at current UMN research that examines how flower farmscaping can help recruit wild pollinators to support strawberry production.
    Nathan Hecht
    Graduate Research Assistant, University of Minnesota


  • 50 Minute Break Out Session 
    GARDENING & FARMING CAN BE A PART OF CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS
    In this workshop, we will explore ways to reverse, mitigate and adapt to climate change in our gardens and farms around the mid-west. Tackling climate change while growing flowers, vegetables and fruit is possible. Learn about the recent pH soil amendment study that improved soil health and sequestering carbon. Engage in the recent Agrophenology study underway experimenting with crop plantings as they relate to "wild" indicator species to create a nature-based planting calendar that can be more reliable than the standard calendar we use today. Share stories, ideas and strategies on climate change solutions, together. The workshop will be half presentation and half participation. Carpe diem!
    David Abazs
    Round River and Wolf Ridge Organic Farm Director, Finland, Minnesota

  • 50 Minute Break Out Panel
    GROWING GOOD YOUTH PANEL
    Karen DePratto
    (Moderator) and Xavier Porter, Minnesota Landscape Arboretum

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    TINY BUT MIGHTY: HOW SOIL BUGS, WORMS, AND MICROBES INFLUENCE PLANT HEALTH
    Did you know that one tablespoon of healthy soil can contain more microbes than there are people on earth? It's true! This talk will discuss the role of microbes- as well as insects, worms and more- in maintaining soil health and optimum growing conditions for plants. Not only will you learn about the organisms that live in the soil, but you'll learn about their role in decomposing organic material, making nutrients available to plants, and even keeping plant diseases and pests at bay. This talk will offer several tips for maintaining a healthy soil ecosystem for optimum plant growth, and will be enjoyable for gardeners at all levels of experience.
    Anne Sawyer, Extension Educator, University of Minnesota Extension

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    FINDING SOLUTIONS THROUGH PLANT BREEDING

    Genetic diversity in the plants species we love offers a treasure trove of possibilities.  As new challenges or opportunities emerge for the plants we love, reshuffling the genetic deck of cards through plant breeding has offered solutions again and again. Working with current and earlier cultivars along with introducing genes of wild relatives into the mix can lead to not only the desired outcomes, but also many surprises. David loves breeding new cultivars that are adapted to our climate and help us overcome market limiting traits.  His works towards this through strategically selecting for disease resistance (e.g. roses and ninebark), greater winter hardiness (e.g. roses and ornamental/edible elderberries), and working with increased pollinator activity (e.g. ageratum). Every new plant has a story how it was developed and its journey into the marketplace. David will share some of his experiences developing and finding markets for new cultivars. 

    David Zlesak
    Associate Professor of Horticulture, University of Wisconsin River Falls

  • Self-guided Origami Tours Origami in the Garden

Saturday, June 16 Sessions & Panels 

Thomas Rainer, 2017 Minnesota Master Gardener Keynote Speaker



Red Barn Farm



Bee and Pollinator Discover Center



Ariel Dressler



Mary Mayer



Sam Bauer



Jeff Lowenfels book



Allen Branhagen

 

Butterfly Weed

 

Origami in the Garden

 

Buffalo Origami

 

  • Plenary Speaker
    MAINSTREAMING POLLINATORS IN OUR EVERYDAY LIVES
    One definition of 'mainstreaming' is the process of becoming accepted as normal.  Our goal is to mainstream pollinator health and conservation, so that maintaining quality floral habitat for bees and other pollinators is considered a normal and important activity in people's lives.  Many groups are making great progress toward this goal internationally, nationally, and locally.  Our research efforts to improve honey bee colony health and floral nutrition will be presented as one component of many exciting pollinator projects underway at the University of Minnesota.
    Dr. Marla Spivak
    Distinguished McKnight Professor, and Extension Entomologist, Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota

  • 50 Minute Plenary Session
    UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA ENTOMOLOGY NATIVE BEE RESEARCH
    Guides to Minnesota Bumble Bees Handouts (Male) (Female)

    Dr. Elaine Evans from the Bee Lab in the UMN Department of Entomology will provide an update on the latest Bee Lab research on native bee diversity and conservation. Learn what you can do in your garden to help the endangered rusty-patched bumble bee, provide nesting habitat for stem-nesting bees, and create a bee lawn.
    Elaine Evans
    Assistant Extension Professor, University of Minnesota
     
  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    PREVENTING ACHES AND PAINS WHILE GARDENING,  U of W Extension Blog
    The physical activities of gardening can create wear and tear on our bodies, but a few adaptions to what you do can reduce the aches and pains. 
    Mike Maddox
    Director, University of Wisconsin Master Gardener Program

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    GLORIOUS GRASSES OF THE UPPER MIDWEST
    Dr. Mary Meyer
    Minnesota Landscape Arboretum

  • TREES FOR THE BOLD NORTH: EMERGING SELECTION AND EVALUATION CRITERIA
    Alan Branhagen Handout
    Director of Horticulture, University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum
  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    THE SCIENCE OF COVER CROPS IN THE VEGETABLE GARDEN

    Annie Klodd

    Assistant Extension Professor for Fruit and Vegetable Production, University of Minnesota

  • UPDATES FROM THE FRONT: BEE SQUAD
    Becky Masterson
    Bee Squad Associate Program Director, University of Minnesota

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    INNOVATIVE INTERACTIONS WITH THE PUBLIC: PLANT MAKER STUDIO
    Ariel Dressler
    Minnesota Landscape Arboretum

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    HYDROPONIC GARDENING THE VERY EASY WAY
    Larry Cipolla
    CCi Gardening Connections, Hennepin County Master Gardener

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    POLLINATOR FRIENDLY GARDENING
    The backstory of how I became interested in pollinators, threats to pollinators, special mention of native bees, the three pillars of pollinator friendly gardening: providing food, supporting reproduction and pesticide alternatives.
    Rhonda Fleming Hayes
    Author and Columnist

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session 
    LOW INPUT LAWNS- FESCUE TO THE RESCUE
    Lawns are often under the environmental spotlight due to the high level of inputs required to maintain some of the most popular species, such as bluegrass or ryegrass. However, alternatives to these high-maintenance species exist. In this session we will discuss the multitude of low input fescue options for home lawns and other settings. This presentation is for a beginner to intermediate audience level.
    Sam Bauer
    Extension Educator, Horticulture, University of Minnesota

  • 50 Minute Break Out Session
    BUILDING BETTER LAWNS: HOW TO MAKE ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY LAWNS FOR BOTH YOUR COMMUNITY AND YOUR POLLINATORS
    Bee losses and declines in health and productivity are often associated with a number of factors, including a lack of high quality forage. One potential route for improving bee health within urban and suburban areas is through habitat enhancement in turfgrass areas. Turf lawns are typically maintained as a highly managed mixture or blend of different turfgrass species to maintain a desired aesthetic, or recreational function. In this study, we attempt to reduce lawn inputs while also enhancing turfgrass areas with low-growing flowers that can provide valuable forage for bees. Additionally, we attempt to quantify the abundance and diversity of bees within parks with naturally occurring white clover, and parks that have been enhanced with low growing flowers. In total nearly 5000 bees have been collected over three years off of lawn flowers, representing over 40 species of bees. All audience levels are welcome.
    James Wolfin
    Research Assistant, University of Minnesota

  • Self-guided Origami Tours Origami in the Garden

 



Register                          

Pre-Conference Tours     

Agenda                           

Confirmed Speakers        

Poster Showcase             

Meet Your Planning Team   

Additional Information     

Area Accommodations      

Endorsing Organizations
and Sponsors     

View and Print Conference Flyer

QUESTIONS ABOUT REGISTRATION?

Call 612-301-1210
Email: ArbEdu@umn.edu

Cancellation Policy: Registration cancellations must be made two weeks prior to class date in order to receive refund. A $5 processing fee will apply.

Achieve your CE Goal!
Continuing Education*


Certificates of attendance will be available for:

  • Extension Master Gardeners
  • Extension Master Naturalists
  • Tree Care Advisors
  • Others, by request

* Certificates of Attendance must be submitted to your governing organization in order to determine if hours are eligible for continuing education credit. Contact your county/region for more information.